FAQ
Air Quality
+How can I tell if my air ducts are leaking?
+How often should I replace my air filter?
+What is carbon monoxide, and why is it considered deadly?
+Does my home have an indoor air quality problem?

Heating & Cooling
+How can I tell if my attic is under insulated?
+Why is an air conditioner refrigerant charge so expensive?
+Should I set my thermostat to “off” when I leave my home to save energy?
+Why is my air conditioner blowing hot air?
+How can I tell if my air ducts are leaking?
+How do I find an energy efficient air conditioner that saves me money?
+What is a heat pump?
+What size furnace do I need for my home?
+Why does my heater smell like something is burning?
+What does AFUE stand for?
+Do I really need a furnace tune-up every year?
+Why is my heater blowing cold air?
+Why should I replace my filter regularly?
+Should I have my air ducts cleaned?
+Why are some rooms in my home more difficult to cool than others?
+Should I adjust my thermostat so my AC isn’t running while I’m gone?
+How Often Should I have My Equipment Serviced?
+How does the Clean Air Act impact heating and cooling systems?
+What is meant by a ‘ton’ of refrigeration?
+Why can’t you ad coolant to my system without checking for a leak or repairing an exiting leak?
+How often should I replace the filter?
+We are replacing our AC unit this season, what advice can you give me?
+How does my heating and air conditioning system move air throughout my home?
+Why should I replace my working furnace or air conditioner?
+What does HVAC stand for?

Plumbing
+How do I know if I need a new water heater?
+Are chemical drain cleaners (like Liquid Plumber and Drano) okay to use?
+Why does my toilet seem to randomly flush on its own?
+How often should I have my water heater serviced?
+When my toilet is flushed, the water in the shower gets hotter. Why?
+Will a tankless water heater provide instant hot water to all my faucets and showers?
+How do I know if I need a new water heater?
+How can I avoid cold showers?
+What causes the low water pressure in my home?
+Should I use hot or cold water while running my garbage disposal?
+I’m replacing my toilet – what does the gpf number mean?
+Why does my toilet smell like sewer gas?
+My garbage disposal smells. What can I do?
+What is a low flow toilet?
+What does it mean when I hear a rumbling sound coming from the water heater?
+Is there any maintenance for a water heater that I can do?
+What is the white substance around my shower head and faucet?
+I have a problem with the plumbing in my house making groaning and honking noises.
+How do I eliminate the foul odor coming from my garbage disposal?
+I think my kitchen drains are partially clogged because the sink drains slowly. What do you recommen
+What could be the cause of my recent high water bills?
+What is the recommendation for replacing a toilet in my home?


How can I tell if my air ducts are leaking?
There are three tell-tale signs that your air ducts have a leak:
  • Hot or cool spots in your home - Major leaks keep cooled or heated air from reaching certain parts of your home.
  • Your home is extra dusty when you turn on your HVAC system- When there’s a leak in your ductwork, it will suck up dust, dirt, and other contaminants and blow them out through the vents in your home. 
  • High utility bills - less air transported around your home means your air conditioner or furnace has to work longer to heat or cool your home, which requires more energy and therefore more money.

If you think you have a leak, call a professional come out and confirm it, and fix it if necessary.
 

How often should I replace my air filter?
This is a difficult questions, as it depends on the type of air filter you have in your heating and cooling system as well as how dusty your home is.

We recommend at least checking your air filter every month (or 30 days) and changing it when it is visibly dirty. Cheap fiberglass filters must be changed every month. More efficient air filters, like pleated filters, may last up to 3 months.

What is carbon monoxide, and why is it considered deadly?
Carbon monoxide is known as the “silent killer” because it is a toxic gas that is tasteless, odorless, and colorless.

According to cpsc.gov, 170 people die from carbon monoxide poisoning each year in the U.S due to malfunctioning fuel-burning home appliances such as furnaces and water heaters.

The only way to detect carbon monoxide in your home is with a carbon monoxide monitor

Does my home have an indoor air quality problem?
According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), most homes in the United States suffer from poor indoor air quality. In fact, the EPA estimates that the average home’s indoor air quality is two to six times worse than outdoor air.

People exposed to indoor air pollution may experience one or more of the following symptoms:
  • Dryness and irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Hypersensitivity and allergies
  • Sinus congestion
  • Coughing and sneezing
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
If you are experiencing any of the symptoms above, note when your condition is the worst and if it gets better when you leave your home. Do others in your home also have similar symptoms? If so, your home may have an indoor air pollution problem.

Pitzer’s has a variety of air quality products designed to help you breathe easier. Schedule a free consultation with us today. 

How can I tell if my attic is under insulated?
Here’s a rule of thumb: If your insulation is spread evenly throughout your attic and it’s even with or below the level of your floor joists, your attic needs more insulation.

The recommended level is 10-14 inches of insulation in your attic.

Why is an air conditioner refrigerant charge so expensive?
If you’re asking this, that means your air conditioner probably uses R-22 refrigerant. R-22 is being phased out by the EPA because it supposedly contains ozone-depleting substances.

And since you can’t just switch over to a new refrigerant, you’re stuck needing a refrigerant that is in high demand but low supply. 

Should I set my thermostat to “off” when I leave my home to save energy?
No. Turning your air conditioner or furnace off causes your system to spend too much time and energy getting your home to the desired temperature when you turn it back on. Just turn it back a few degrees instead of turning it off.

Or you could install a programmable thermostat which automatically changes the temperature based on your schedule, saving you money as a result. 

Why is my air conditioner blowing hot air?
It could be a variety of things, but here are the most common causes from most likely to least likely:
  • A low refrigerant/Freon charge.
  • Dirty evaporator coils on the outside unit
  • A dirty air filter
Don’t let your system continue to run if it’s blowing hot air since it will cause the compressor to fail (a costly repair).

How can I tell if my air ducts are leaking?
There are three tell-tale signs that your air ducts have a leak:
  • Hot or cool spots in your home - Major leaks keep cooled or heated air from reaching certain parts of your home.
  • Your home is extra dusty when you turn on your HVAC system- When there’s a leak in your ductwork, it will suck up dust, dirt, and other contaminants and blow them out through the vents in your home. 
  • High utility bills - less air transported around your home means your air conditioner or furnace has to work longer to heat or cool your home, which requires more energy and therefore more money.

If you think you have a leak, call a professional come out and confirm it, and fix it if necessary.
 

How do I find an energy efficient air conditioner that saves me money?
An air conditioner’s energy efficiency is measured by it's  Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) rating. This tells you the relative amount of energy the air conditioner needs to provide a specific cooling output.

Bottom line: The higher the SEER rating, the more energy efficient the air conditioner and the more money you will save.

The minimum SEER rating is 13, but it pays to find air conditioners with a higher SEER rating to get more savings.  

What is a heat pump?
Heat pumps are like air conditioners that can also work in reverse to heat your home. True to it’s name, a heat pump pumps heat from cool places to warmer places, making the cool areas cooler and the warmer areas warmer.

For example, in the summer, the heat pump would move the heat in your home to the outdoors, cooling you down. And during the winter, it would move any heat that’s outside and move it indoors, warming you up.

Heat pumps can be much more efficient than furnaces, saving you money during the cooler seasons. 

What size furnace do I need for my home?
Gas furnaces are measured in the amount of heat they output (BTU’s). The best way to determine the correct size furnace for your home is to have a professional heating contractor look at your home.

A correctly sized furnace is important because it greatly affects the comfort and efficiency of your home. If your furnace is too big, it will cycle on and off frequently and consume more fuel than necessary. If it is too small, it will be constantly running (again, using more fuel than necessary.)


Why does my heater smell like something is burning?
Have you ever noticed a burning smell when you first turn on your furnace or heater for the winter? It smells dangerous, but it is normal.

During the summer when your heater sits unused, dust settles on your furnace. Then, when you turn it on for the first time in the winter, the furnace burns off that dust.

A tune-up cleans your furnace’s internal components and so can help reduce this burning smell (in addition to increasing energy efficiency.)

What does AFUE stand for?
AFUE stands for “Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency.”

This efficiency rating, which is measured in percentages, tells you how efficient your furnace or boiler is at converting its fuel into heat for your home.

For example, older furnaces have an AFUE of 50%. That means that for every dollar you spend, only half of it actually heats your home. The other 50 cents is lost in the combustion process.

Federal law now mandates that furnaces need to have an AFUE rating of 80%, which means that for every dollar you spend, 80 cents of it actually heats your home. 

Do I really need a furnace tune-up every year?
Yes. Yearly heating tune-ups are recommended by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), ENERGY STAR and your local utilities. Annual heating tune-ups keep your furnace running safely and efficiently all winter long and can also help prevent repairs and increase the life of your heater.

Why is my heater blowing cold air?
It’s extremely frustrating when your heater seems to be blowing cold air instead of heating your home! But before we answer your question, do you have a gas heater (furnace) or an electric heater (heat pump)?

Check your thermostat. Make sure the fan is not set to “on” and the thermostat is currently set to “heat”.

If the thermostat on your furnace is set correctly, it could be your igniter or thermal coupler. Contact an HVAC professional for diagnosis and repair.

If you have a heat pump, your heater may be going through its regular defrost cycle. All heat pumps have a built-in defrost mode. In order to melt the ice from the coils, the heat pump will turn off the indoor fan (that blows heat through your vents), the outdoor fan will be stopped, and the heat pump will activate its cooling mode. In this way, the refrigerant becomes warm and melts the ice off the coils. Sometimes you may notice unheated air coming out of your vents during this cycle. This process usually takes about 2-10 minutes. If your heat pump continues cycling cold air through your home, you may need to contact a professional for diagnosis.

Why should I replace my filter regularly?
The air filter in your heating and cooling system exists to protect your equipment from large particles that can damage your unit. When a dirty air filter is not replaced, unnecessary strain is placed on the heater or air conditioner because the airflow becomes restricted. Also, a dirty filter increases the chances that harmful air pollutants will pass unhindered into your system and damage your equipment. We recommend you check your filter at least once a month and replace when visibly dirty.

Should I have my air ducts cleaned?
The air quality inside your home is worse than the air outside. Heating and air conditioning systems collect a variety of airborne contaminants, which can then be blown back into your home’s air. This can often cause allergy and asthma symptoms to flare up for some family members. You can reduce indoor air pollutants like dust, mold, pollen and pet dander with a thorough duct cleaning. A whole-home air cleaner can also improve your indoor air quality. Contact Pitzer's One Hour for more information.

Why are some rooms in my home more difficult to cool than others?
It's most likely that the distribution of airflow throughout your home is unbalanced. This often happens when your ductwork is leaking, damaged or blocked in some way. Over time, seals can become weak allowing your ductwork to crack and leak. Heated or conditioned air that passes through the ductwork from room to room can escape through these weaknesses making it more difficult to achieve consistent temperatures throughout your home.

It is also possible that vents can be blocked either by ductwork that is too tight, meaning sharp bends or kinks are reducing the airflow, or something in the room is physically blocking the vent like a couch, curtains or other objects.

Should I adjust my thermostat so my AC isn’t running while I’m gone?
Generally speaking, it's a good idea to adjust your thermostat, but not to turn it off. The key is by how much you sent your thermostat back and for how long. The U.S. Department of Energy claims you will benefit from energy savings when you set your thermostat back no more than five degrees for at least eight hours. Half day shopping trips to the mall, or lunch out with a friend is not long enough to make a substantial difference in the amount of energy your A/C consumes - and adjusting more than 5 degrees causes the AC to spend too much time and energy recouping. To help you remember – and time – the setback temperatures, consider installing a programmable thermostat to do it for you.

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How Often Should I have My Equipment Serviced?
Like your car, your heating and air conditioning system requires regular maintenance. Ideally, your units should be serviced once a year. Doing so keeps your unit reliable by helping you avoid unexpected repairs. Maintenance will also prolong the life of the unit and ensure safe operation. Regular tune-ups can also help your unit run more efficiently which helps you save on energy costs.

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How does the Clean Air Act impact heating and cooling systems?
The portion of the Clean Air Act that applies to the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) industry encourages the development of ozone-friendly substitutes for chemicals that contain ozone destroying chlorine, which are called hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). The chemical refrigerant of choice for more than four decades, referred to as R-22, is in the HCFC category. R-22 is widely used in heat pumps and AC condensing units to heat and cool homes. Today, a refrigerant called R-410A is used because of its ozone-friendly properties.

What is meant by a ‘ton’ of refrigeration?
Confusingly, the unit has little to do with weight, as used in everyday language. One ton of refrigeration is the term used to refer to 12,000 B.T.U.s/hour (British Thermal Units/Hour) of cooling effect. Thus, a condensing unit with a cooling capacity of 60,000 B.T.U.s/hour is said to have a capacity of 5 tons.

Why can’t you ad coolant to my system without checking for a leak or repairing an exiting leak?
Since July 1, 1992 it is illegal to release refrigerants into the atmosphere, either intentional or accidental, because they can cause severe damage to the ozone layer. When refrigerants such as Chlorofluorocarbon’s (CFCs) are removed, they should be recycled to clean out any contaminants and returned to a usable condition.

How often should I replace the filter?
There’s no one-size-fits-all answer. The frequency of filter changes is driven by how much your heating and air conditioning system operates, which is also driven by your individual climate.

Start by checking the system’s filters at least once a month. Hold the used filter up to the light and compare it to a clean "spare." When light is obscured by captured dust and dirt particles, the old filter should be changed. Keep a record for one year and then replace the filter on that basis. At a minimum, it is always a good idea to change filters at the start of the heating and cooling seasons and then in between according to your need. Also, it is a good idea to have your heating and air system checked at the beginning of heating and cooling season to insure proper operation.

We are replacing our AC unit this season, what advice can you give me?
Replacing your system is one of the biggest financial decisions you will make. The reason for this is that the life expectancy of a system is around 12 years. When choosing a contractor, pick a company to install the unit based on quality and customer service, not solely on price. The name brand of the equipment is not as important as the installing contractor. Another thing to keep in mind when replacing a system is that the duct system you are connecting to is sealed tight with the proper amount of return air. With the new higher efficiency units, you also have to be careful that you replace your system with the proper sized unit so you don’t end up with a house that is cool but has high humidity. Do some homework, pick quality contractors, and find someone you trust and you will have a successful installation that will bring you years of comfort and the least amount of overall cost.

How does my heating and air conditioning system move air throughout my home?
A fan draws indoor air in through vents called return grills located throughout your home. The air travels through ducts that run to your systems’ air handler, where it is returned into the conditioned space through supply vents or registers in your wall, ceilings or floors.

Why should I replace my working furnace or air conditioner?
Although your present furnace or air conditioner may be working, if it is more than 12 years old you should consider replacing it with a new high efficiency system. A new heating and air conditioning system could save up to 50 percent on energy costs, and save you money in the long run on heating repairs. While these products save you money on your utility bills, they also offer a better degree of comfort within your home.

What does HVAC stand for?
HVAC (pronounced h-vack or spelled out) stands for Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning. The three functions of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning are closely interrelated. All seek to provide thermal comfort, acceptable indoor air quality, and reasonable installation, operation, and maintenance costs. HVAC systems can provide ventilation, reduce air infiltration, and maintain pressure relationships between spaces. Your heating and air technician goes by the name of HVAC contractor, and can provide heating repair expertise.

How do I know if I need a new water heater?
 Here are a few signs that your water heater is nearing its end:
  • Age – It’s over 10 years old.
  • Inconsistent temperatures – It starts giving you uncomfortable lukewarm or fluctuating water temperatures.
  • High energy usage – Older water heaters are much less efficient and push up your water bill.
  • Rust-colored water – This could be the water heater or problems with your pipes.
  • Leaks – Leaks in the water heater’s tank are difficult and sometimes impossible to repair.

To learn if you really need a new water heater, you can ask one of our experts for a more accurate diagnosis.

Are chemical drain cleaners (like Liquid Plumber and Drano) okay to use?
Chemical drain cleaners are not only bad for the environment, but they can also eat away at your plumbing, causing leaks. For those reasons, we do not recommend their use.

Instead, consider using an earth-friendly bio-enzyme drain cleaner like BioBen.

Why does my toilet seem to randomly flush on its own?
Over the life of your toilet, you will probably experience this phenomenon, also known as “phantom” flushing. It occurs when water leaks from the tank of the toilet into the bowl. When the water in the tank falls below a certain level, it will fill up, making a sound often associated with flushing (and wasting hundreds of gallons of water).

The most common cause of these phantom flushes is a weathered flapper in the toilet tank. This rubber piece wears out and the seal weakens over the lifespan of your toilet. Replacing the flapper usually solves this problem. If you are still having problems, contact a plumber.

How often should I have my water heater serviced?
The biggest threat to any type of water heater is sediment and calcium buildup. The harder the water, the more quickly it can accumulate. We recommend that our customers have their water heaters tuned-up about once a year. During the tune-up, we will flush your water heater, clean it and check to make sure it is operating safely and efficiently. Annual water heater maintenance will reduce your chances of a costly repair and extend the life of your water heater. Schedule a tune-up online.

When my toilet is flushed, the water in the shower gets hotter. Why?
The simple answer is poor water pressure. When running your shower, you are using both cold and hot water, mixed together to give you your preferable showering temperature. When the toilet is flushed, it refills the tank using cold water. In homes or bathrooms with lower water pressure, this takes some of the cold water away from the shower. The hot water is flowing at the same rate, but with less cold water to balance it out, which makes your perfect mixture much warmer. If this problem gets worse, there may be larger issues, such as corroded pipes or blockages. Contact a professional plumber for diagnosis and repair.

Will a tankless water heater provide instant hot water to all my faucets and showers?
Tankless water heaters are sometimes called instantaneous or on-demand water heaters. This has led to some confusion for people who have installed whole house tankless water heaters expecting to have instant hot water as soon as they turn on their shower or faucet.

While the tankless water heater is heating the water as soon as you turn on your faucet or shower, the cold water that existed in the pipes between the faucet and the water heater still needs to be flushed out, just like with any whole-home water heater. So, when you turn on the faucet, there will be a small amount of cold water first.

If you desire instant hot water for your shower or faucet, you can install a smaller-point-of-use tankless water heater designed to deliver hot water to a specific fixture.

Contact our professional plumbers for more information on the advantages of tankless water heaters. 

How do I know if I need a new water heater?
The easiest way to tell if your water heater has reached its expiration date is if simply stops working. However, it’s best to catch it before that happens so you’re not left without hot water. Here are the most common telltale signs your water heater is nearing the end.
  • Age – over 15 years old.
  • Rust-colored water – could be the water heater or problems with your pipes.
  • Leaks – leaks in the tank of a water heater are difficult to impossible to repair.
  • Inconsistent temperatures – lukewarm or fluctuating water temperatures.
  • High energy usage – older water heaters are much less efficient.
These are only some of the signs it may be time for a new water heater. Schedule a consultation for the most accurate diagnosis.

How can I avoid cold showers?
If you or your guests are experiencing cold showers, it is most likely because you have a traditional water heater and you are using the heated water more quickly than the water heater can keep up. This is especially common when more hot water is being used than normal (i.e. you have guests over).

One solution is to purchase a water heater with a larger tank. However, this will also increase the energy used to heat the water. A better solution is to either replace the traditional water heater with a whole-home tankless water heater or install an on-demand water heater at the point-of-use. Contact us for more information.

What causes the low water pressure in my home?
Low water pressure in your home can be caused by a number of things including, mineral deposits, water leaks, malfunctioning water valves or corroded pipes. Check with your neighbors, and if their water pressure isn’t a problem, the cause is most likely with your home’s plumbing. Contact Pitzer's professional Ben Franklin plumbers and our plumbing technician will help you identify the problem and the solution.

Should I use hot or cold water while running my garbage disposal?
While running hot water through your garbage disposal won’t harm the disposal, we recommend running only cold water through your disposal. Using warm water with a disposal can cause greasy and fatty foods to be softened and coagulated in the disposal. Run a steady flow of cold water during disposal use and for 30 seconds after the grinding has stopped to make sure that all the food particles are flushed through the drain line.

I’m replacing my toilet – what does the gpf number mean?
Gpf, or gallons per flush, is a measurement of the amount of water that is used each time the toilet is flushed. Any residential toilet manufactured since 1994 must use no more than 1.6 gpf. For contrast, the previous industry standard was anywhere between 3 and 7 gpf. The lower the number, the less water the toilet uses and the more money it saves you in water consumption. 

Why does my toilet smell like sewer gas?
Usually when your toilet emits a sewer smell, it means the seal beneath the toilet has worn away allowing sewer gas to seep between the flange and the toilet. In other instances, the smell could be a result of a clog somewhere in your sewer line. To be sure, it's best to contact a professional to properly diagnose and repair the problem.

My garbage disposal smells. What can I do?
Over time, your garbage disposal can build up a slimy residue that sticks to the inside walls and its blades. Eventually this buildup will begin to stink. To reduce or eliminate this odor, don't pour bleach or other harsh chemicals down the drain - these can be dangerous for the environment and are not the best way to clean. Instead, try pouring 2-4 cups of ice down the disposal and grind them up briefly before washing the chips away with water. This will loosen the residue and clean any stuck on grime.

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What is a low flow toilet?
The need to conserve water has become more important than ever before. At one time, toilets were responsible for some of the greatest water consumption inside a home using up to, and sometimes more, than 5 gallons of water in one flush! To counter this, today's toilets flush just as effectively, but only use 1.6 gallons of water per flush. Compared to older models of toilets, low flush toilets can save a family of four more than 22,000 gallons of water annually!

What does it mean when I hear a rumbling sound coming from the water heater?
Rumbling sounds can be an indication that sediment has built up on the bottom of the water heater. Water can become trapped in this sediment and begin to boil. This means the water heater is not operating efficiently and the sediment isn’t allowing the heat to transfer to the water in the tank.

You may try draining a few gallons of water off the bottom of the water heater tank. This is done by attaching a drain hose to the valve at the bottom of the tank. Allow it to drain for about five minutes. Many newer models of water heaters have a new feature that prohibits the buildup of sediment in the tank. If your heater is an older model, it may be cost effective to replace the water heater if the buildup is severe.

Contact Benjamin Franklin Plumbing® for membership opportunities in our Ben Franklin SocietyTM, for year-round maintenance of your water heater.

WARNING: Hot water is dangerous. Discharge the water into a floor drain, laundry tub or bathtub. Hot water will kill your grass if allowed to run on your lawn and will also crack a toilet bowl if discharged into the toilet. Turn off power to water heater prior to draining.

Is there any maintenance for a water heater that I can do?
Yes, you should test the pressure relief valve regularly and replace it if it fails to operate. At least once a year you should flush out the sediments. As long as a tank has a functioning anode, it should not rust. Therefore you should have the anode checked, by a Benjamin Franklin Plumbing® professional about once every two years.

What is the white substance around my shower head and faucet?
The unsightly buildup is mineral deposits. To remove these deposits from the showerhead, take a plastic bag and pour a cup of vinegar in it. Place the bag over the showerhead and use a twist tie to hold it in place overnight. In the morning, remove the bag and use an old toothbrush to gently scrub off the deposits. You might be able to remove the aerators from the faucets and allow them to soak in the vinegar overnight. Your Benjamin Franklin Plumbing® professional can explain to you all about the water softening and conditioning options available to you through our H2O Harmony system.

I have a problem with the plumbing in my house making groaning and honking noises.
It could be that you have lost your “air cushion.” To get it back, turn the water supply off at the main valve. Turn on all the faucets around your home. Then turn on the main valve again and shut off each faucet. This should take care of the problem.

How do I eliminate the foul odor coming from my garbage disposal?
This is a common plumbing troubleshooting question. Foul odors occur from a buildup of food debris within the disposal. To eliminate odors, place ice cubes and lemon peels or orange peels in the disposal, and run for 30 seconds. Next, squirt a little liquid dish detergent into the disposer while it is still running. Finally, run cold water for about 30 seconds to rinse all the debris away.

I think my kitchen drains are partially clogged because the sink drains slowly. What do you recommen
First, try using a plunger. Second, try using a liquid drain opener, but use caution and read the directions. Third, you can remove the trap and remove any debris. Be careful if you have used a liquid drain opener, because there may be some in the trap. Fourth, if the clog is beyond the trap, there are drain augers that extend from about 15 feet to about 50 feet. There are also special enzyme-based drain openers, like Benjamin Franklin Plumbing®’s BioBen®, that will help dissolve buildup in pipes in older homes.

What could be the cause of my recent high water bills?
You may want to check to see if a toilet is leaking. Check the water level in the tank to see if water is overflowing into the overflow pipe. This is the pipe in the middle of the tank which has a small tube connected to it. In the event water is running into the overflow pipe, adjust the fill valve to stop the flow approximately one inch below the top of the overflow tube or to the water level mark stamped on the side of the tank. Periodic maintenance by a plumbing professional will ensure proper operation.

What is the recommendation for replacing a toilet in my home?
When considering any new fixture for your home, we recommend that you choose a fixture made by one of the major manufacturers. If cracks or fissures are present in the tank or bowl, this can impede the operation of the fixture. Poor mounting and deteriorating rings and seals can affect the operation as well. Keep in mind that many of the new toilets conform to new government standards that require they use no more than 1.6 gallons per flush. If you are replacing an older model, this may take getting use to.